UN General Assembly Resolution 1353 (XIV) of 1959, New York

Ireland and Malaya requested consideration of “The Question of Tibet” in the UN General Assembly. Resolution 1353 (XIV) was adopted by a vote of 45 to 9, with 26 abstentions.

21 October, 1959

The General Assembly,

Recalling the principles regarding fundamental human rights and freedoms set out in the Charter of the United Nations and in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights adopted by the General Assembly on 10 December 1948,

Considering that the fundamental human rights and freedoms to which the Tibetan people, like all others, are entitled include the right to civil and religious liberty for all without distinction,

Mindful also of the distinctive cultural and religious heritage of the people of Tibet and of the autonomy which they have traditionally enjoyed,

Gravely concerned at reports, including the official statements of His Holiness the Dalai Lama, to the effect that the fundamental human rights and freedoms of the people of Tibet have been forcibly denied them,

Deploring the effect of these events in increasing international tension and embittering the relations between peoples at a time when earnest and positive efforts are being made by responsible leaders to reduce tension and improve international relations,

  1. Affirms its belief that respect for the principles of the Charter of the United Nations and of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is essential for the evolution of a peaceful world order based on the rule of law;
  2. Calls for respect for the fundamental human rights of the Tibetan people and for their distinctive cultural and religious life.

Remarks from various countries:

Remarks by Cuba
Remarks by Malaya
Remarks by New Zealand
Remarks by Pakistan
Remarks by Ireland